Local property market information for the serious investor

Month: November 2016

Edgware Landlords and Tenants : What does the Tenant Fee Banning order mean for you?

edgwaremainli

  • Tenant Fees set to banned within 12 to 18 months
  • Rents due to rise as those fees passed to Landlords
  • Landlords won’t be worse off – and neither will tenants or agents

With our new Chancellor of the Exchequer revealing a ban on tenant fees in his first Autumn Statement on Wednesday what does this actually mean for Edgware tenants and Edgware landlords?

The private rental sector in Edgware forms an important part of the Edgware housing market and the engagement from the chancellor in Wednesday’s Autumn Statement is a welcome sign that it is recognised as such. I have long supported the regulation of lettings agents which will ensconce and cement best practice across the rental industry and,  I believe that measures to improve the situation of tenants should be introduced in a way that supports the growing professionalism of the sector. Over the last few years, there has been an increasing number of regulations and legislation governing private renting and it is important that the role of qualified, well trained and regulated lettings agents is understood.

Great News for Edgware Tenants

So, let’s look at tenants .. this is great news for them, isn’t it?  Well before you all crack open the Prosecco, read this …

Although I can see prohibiting letting agent fees being welcomed by Edgware tenants, at least in the short term, they won’t realise that it will rebound back on them.

First up, it will take between 12 and 18 months to ban fees, as consultation needs to take place, then it will take an Act of Parliament to implement the change. A prohibition on agent fees may preclude tenants from receiving an invoice at the start of the tenancy, but the unescapable outcome will be an increase in the proportion of costs which will be met by landlords, which in turn will be passed on to tenants through higher rents.

Published at the same time as the Autumn Statement, hidden in the Office for Budget Responsibility’s Economic and Fiscal Outlook on the Autumn Statement (The Office for Budget Responsibility being created by Government in 2010 to provide independent and authoritative analysis of the UK’s public finances), it said on Wednesday …

“The Government has also announced its intention to ban additional fees charged by private letting agents. Specific details about timing and implementation remain outstanding, so we have not adjusted our forecast. Nevertheless, it is possible that a ban on fees would be passed through to higher private rents”

 

The charity Shelter and Scotland

Scotland banned Letting Fees in 2012. The charity Shelter have been a big voice in persuading and lobbying the Government since it managed to persuade the Scottish Parliament to ban fees in 2012. On all the TV and radio shows at the moment, they keep talking about their Independent Research, which they said showed that,

“renters, landlords and the industry as a whole had benefited from banning fees to renters in Scotland. It found that any negative side-effects of clarifying the ban on fees to renters in Scotland have been minimal for letting agencies, landlords and renters, and the sector remains healthy.”

 Going on,

“Many industry insiders had predicted that abolishing fees would impact on rents for tenants, but our research show that this hasn’t been the case. The evidence showed that landlords in Scotland were no more likely to have increased rents since 2012 than landlords elsewhere in the UK. It found that where rents had risen more in Scotland than in other comparable parts of the UK in 2013, it was explained by economic factors and not related to the clarification of the law on letting fees”

 .. yet the devil is in the detail….

Only yesterday Shelter were quoting this Research from December 2013 to say rents never went up following the tenant fee ban in Q4 2012. I have read that research and I agree with that research, but it was published three years ago, only 12 months after the ban was put into place.

I find it strange they don’t seem to mention what has happened to rents in Scotland in  2014, 2015 and 2016 .. because that tells us a completely different story!

 

What really happened in Scotland to rents?

I have carried out my research up to the end of Q3 2016 and  this is the evidence I have found..

In Scotland, rents have risen, according the CityLets Index

by 15.3% between Q4 2012 and today

(CityLets being the equivalent of Rightmove North of the Border – so they know their onions and have plenty of comparable evidence to back up their numbers).

When I compared the same time frame, using Office of National Statistics figures for the English Regions between 2012 and 2016, this is what has happened to rents

  • North East 2.17% increase
  • North West 2.43% increase
  • Yorkshire and The Humber 3.21% increase
  • East Midlands 5.92% increase
  • West Midlands 5.52% increase
  • East of England 7.07% increase
  • South West 5.82% increase
  • South East 8.26% increase
  • London 10.55% increase

….and let me remind you about Scotland … 15.3% increase.

grah

Are you really telling me the Scottish economy has outstripped London’s over the last 4 years? Is anyone suggesting Scottish wages and the Scottish Economy have boomed to such an extent in the last 4 years they are now the Powerhouse of the UK? .. because if they had, Nicola Sturgeon would have driven down the A1 within a blink of an eye, to demand immediate Independence.

 

 

So what will happen in the Edgware Rental Market in the Short term?

 

Well nothing will happen in the next 12 to 18 months .. it’s business as usual!

… and the long term?

Rents will increase as the fees tenants have previously paid will be passed onto Landlords in the coming few years. Not immediately .. but they will.

As a responsible letting agent, I have a business to run. It takes, according to ARLA, (Association of Residential Letting Agents) on average 17 hours work by a letting agent to get a tenant into a property. We need to complete a whole host of checks prescribed by the Government; including a right to rent check, Anti Money Laundering checks, Legionella Risk Assessments, Gas Safety checks, Affordability Checks, Credit Checks, Smoke Alarm checks, Construction (Design & Management) Regulations 2007 checks, compliance with the Landlord and Tenant Act, registering the deposit so the tenants deposit is safe and carry out references to ensure the tenant has been a good tenant in previous rented properties.

All of which the vast majority of lettings agents take very seriously and are expected to know inside out making us the experts in our field. Yes, there are some awful agents who ruin the reputation for others, but isn’t that the case in most professions?

.. but business is business.

No landlord, no tenant and certainly no letting agent does work for free.

I, along with every other Edgware letting agent will have to consider passing some of that cost onto my landlords in the future. Now of course, landlords would also be able to offset higher letting charges against tax, but I (as I am sure they) wouldn’t want them out of pocket, even after the extra tax relief.

So what does this all mean for the future?

The current application fee for a single person at my lettings agency is £125 and for a couple £250 .. meaning on average, the fee is around £200 per property.

I am part of a Group of 500+ Letting Agents, and recently we had to poll to find the average length of tenancy in our respective agencies. The Government says its 4 years, whilst the actual figure was nearer one year and eleven months, so let’s round that up to two years.

That means £200 needs to found in additional fees to the landlord, on average, every two years.

In Actual Pound Notes

In 2005, the average rent of a Edgware Property was £1102 per month and today it is £1469 per month, a rise of only 33.3%  (against an inflation rate (RPI) of 38.5%).

Using the UK average management rates of 10%, this means the landlord will be paying £1762.8 per annum in management fees.

If the landlord is expected to cover the cost of that additional £200 every two years, rents will only need to rise by an additional 2% a year after 2018, on top of what they have annually grown by in the last 5 years.

So, if that were to happen in Edgware, average rents would rise to £1909 per month by 2022  (see the red line on the graph) and so the landlord would pay £2290.8 per annum in management fees .. which would go towards covering the additional costs without having to raise the level of fees.

 

.. but that is bad news for Edgware Tenants?

Quite the opposite. Look at the blue line on the graph). If the average rent Edgware tenants pay had risen in line with inflation since 2005, that £1102 per month would have risen today to  an average of £1526 per month. (Remember, the average today is only £1469 per month) .. and even if inflation remains at 2% per year for the next six years, the average rent would be £1659 per month by 2022 .. meaning even if landlords increase their rents to cover the costs tenants are still much better off, when we compare to the £1659 per month figure to the £1909 per month figure.

edgwaregraph

Conclusion

The banning of letting fees is good news for landlords, tenants and agents.

It removes the need for tenants to find lump sums of money when they move. That will mean tenants will have greater freedom to move home and still be better off in real terms compared to if rents had increased in line with inflation.

Landlords will be happy as their yield and return will increase with greater rents whilst not paying significantly more in fees to their lettings agency. Letting agents who used to charge fair application fees won’t be penalised as the rent rises will compensate them for any losses.

.. and the agents that charged the silly high application fees .. well that’s their problem. At least I know I can offer the same, if not a better service to both my landlords and tenants in the future in light of this announcement from Phillip Hammond.

If you are a landlord or thinking of becoming one for the first time, and you want to read more articles like this about the Edgware Property Market together with regular postings on what I consider the best buy to let deals in Edgware, out of the many of properties on the market, irrespective of which agent is selling it, then feel free to get in touch! email me on Steve@benjaminstevens.co.uk

If you are in the area feel free to pop into the office we are based at 194 Station Road Edgware Middlesex HA8 7AT– the kettle is always on.

Don’t forget to visit the links below to view back dated deals and Edgware Property News.

Blog – http://www.benjaminstevens.co.uk/edgware-property-blog

Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/BenjaminStevensEstateAgents

Twitter – https://twitter.com/BenjamStevensEA

Website – http://www.benjaminstevens.co.uk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Edgware Property Values increase by 0.41% … good or bad news?

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“How’s the Edgware housing market doing?” asked an upbeat Edgware landlord last week.  “Quite strange”, I replied. Our landlord was perplexed! Let me explain…

Even the Brexit vote has not hindered Edgware’s steady rise in property value, as Edgware property values went up 0.41% last month alone, leaving Edgware values 12.82% higher than a year ago. An increase in demand from buyers and an uninspiring level of supply (i.e. the number of properties on the market) has driven up the value of the Edgware’s housing.

…And that is where the issue is. With Brexit, the coalition of the 2010-15, a double-dip recession and post credit crunch fallout – I was perplexed that the Edgware property market (and values) has remained so strong, still 17.08% higher than 20 months ago. That is until you start to look into the real reasons why we find ourselves in such a great place.

The Edgware (and the UK) housing market is built on the foundations of basic economic rules that any GCSE Economics student should understand. However, at a time when, as a country, we seem eager to uncouple ourselves from all manner of proven facts, anything is up for grabs.

Even the wary RICS said throughout the UK, most of its Chartered Surveyors anticipated house prices to increase in the next six months, which seems contradictory given economic cautions from Mr Hammond and HM Treasury. Even though inflation will rise to around 2% to 3% in 2017 and perhaps a little more in 2018 because of Sterling’s devaluation, together with a high probability of a decelerating GDP and a slight rise in unemployment, how can the RICS and most of my landlords be so confident about the value of our homes?

Well, look at from where we are starting. Nationally, a base of low unemployment, low inflation and preposterously low interest rates, while in Edgware, the local economy is doing quite well for itself. Confidence also plays a part. Confidence can supersede basic economic facts for a short time at least, which is why actual property market changes tend to be more exaggerated, as confidence can turn both positive and negative very quickly. The fact is, there is a long-term relationship between property values, wages and unemployment. For example, looking at the graph below, you can quite clearly see the ratio of property values to earnings is nowhere near as high as it reached in 2008 and currently is in the middle of the range for the last 30 years. As a country, we are in a good place.

By April 2017, Article 50 will be invoked. This will bring additional political tomfooleries and economic ups and downs. With both purchasers and vendors predisposed by the 24-hour news cycle, which let’s face it, gets more haphazard by the day, it is likely to prove a challenging couple of years … and yes, Edgware property values might drop slightly in 2017, but based on what we know of the UK plc now, the UK and Edgware property values are not projected to move that much over 2017 or 2018.  Going into the next two years, we are in much better financial shape as a country compared to the last two crashes of 1987 and 2008.

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But, on the other side of the coin, what we also know is that we don’t know much about the form of our economic future or indeed many other facets of our lives. Confidence will continue to be the key player in the Edgware housing market for a while longer – yet this may spur some much needed second-hand market activity? Now, where is my crystal ball?

If you are a landlord or thinking of becoming one for the first time, and you want to read more articles like this about the Edgware Property Market together with regular postings on what I consider the best buy to let deals in Edgware, out of the many of properties on the market, irrespective of which agent is selling it, then feel free to get in touch! email me on Steve@benjaminstevens.co.uk

If you are in the area feel free to pop into the office we are based at 194 Station Road Edgware Middlesex HA8 7AT– the kettle is always on.

Don’t forget to visit the links below to view back dated deals and Edgware Property News.

Blog – http://www.benjaminstevens.co.uk/edgware-property-blog

Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/BenjaminStevensEstateAgents

Twitter – https://twitter.com/BenjamStevensEA

Website – http://www.benjaminstevens.co.uk

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Average Rent Paid by Tenants in Edgware rise to £1,469 per month

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Back in the Spring, there was a surge in Edgware landlords buying buy to let property in Edgware as they tried to beat George Osborne’s new stamp duty changes
which kicked in on the 1st April 2016. To give you an idea of the sort of numbers we are talking about, below are the property statistics for sales either side of the deadline in HA8.

Jan 2016 – 37 properties sold

Feb 2016 – 41 properties sold

March 2016 – 161 properties sold

April 2016 – 49 properties sold

May 2016 – 56 properties sold

Normally, the number of sales in the Spring months is very similar, irrespective of the month. However, as one can see, this year was a completely different picture as landlords moved their purchases forward to beat the stamp duty increase. You would think that even with a basic knowledge of supply and demand economics, rents would be affected in a downwards direction?

However, there appears to be no apparent effect on the levels of rent being asked in Edgware – and more importantly achieved – and this direction of rents is not likely to inverse any time soon, particularly as legislation planned for 2017 might reduce rental stock and push property values ever upward. The decline of buy to let mortgage interest tax relief will make some properties lossmaking, forcing landlords to pass on costs to tenants in the form of higher rents just to stay afloat. Even those who can still operate may be deterred from making further investments, reducing rental stock at a time of severe property shortage.

.. but it’s not all bad news for tenants. Whilst average rents in Edgware since 2005 have increased by 33.3%, inflation has been 38.5% over the same time frame, meaning Edgware tenants are 5.2% better off in real terms when it comes to their rent (which is a sizeable chunk of most people’s monthly household budgets)

 

Year Average Rent in Edgware per month
2005 1102
2006 1130
2007 1164
2008 1212
2009 1233
2010 1225
2011 1272
2012 1329
2013 1373
2014 1393
2015 1440
2016 1469

 

I found it particularly interesting looking at the rent rises over the last five years in Edgware, as it was five years ago we started to see the very early green shoots of growth of the Edgware economy.  As a whole, following the Credit crunch (2011), rents in Edgware have risen by an average of 3.6% a year – fascinating don’t you think?

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The view I am trying to portray is that while renting is often portrayed as the unfavorable alternative to home ownership, many young Edgware professionals like renting as it gives them adaptability with their life. Rents will continue to rise which is good news for landlords as buy to let is an investment but, as can be seen from the statistics, tenants have also had a good deal with below inflation increases in rents in the past. It’s a win-win situation for everyone although on a very personal note, it’s imperative in the future that tenants are not thwarted from saving for a deposit by excessive rental hikes – there has to be a balance.

If you are a landlord or thinking of becoming one for the first time, and you want to read more articles like this about the Edgware Property Market together with regular postings on what I consider the best buy to let deals in Edgware, out of the many of properties on the market, irrespective of which agent is selling it, then feel free to get in touch! email me on Steve@benjaminstevens.co.uk

If you are in the area feel free to pop into the office we are based at 194 Station Road Edgware Middlesex HA8 7AT– the kettle is always on.

Don’t forget to visit the links below to view back dated deals and Edgware Property News.

Blog – http://www.benjaminstevens.co.uk/edgware-property-blog

Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/BenjaminStevensEstateAgents

Twitter – https://twitter.com/BenjamStevensEA

Website – http://www.benjaminstevens.co.uk

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Edgware Housing Crisis? Only 2.2% of Edgware Homes Are For Sale

138The Edgware Property Market continues to disregard the end of the world prophecies of a post Brexit fallout with a return to business as usual after the summer break.

The challenge every Edgware property buyer has faced over the last few years is a lack of choice – there simply hasn’t been much to choose from when buying (be it for investment or owner occupation). Levels are still well down on what would be considered healthy levels from earlier in this decade, as there is still a substantial demand/supply imbalance. Until we start to see consistent and steady increases in properties coming on to the market in Edgware, the market is likely to see upward pressure on property values continue.

However, there may be hope for first time buyers, with homeowners looking to move upmarket and buy to let landlords looking for their next investment, the Edgware property supply crisis just might be starting to ease, as the number of new properties coming onto the market in Edgware has increased.

For example, last month HA8 saw 126 new properties coming on to the market, not bad when you consider for the last year that figure has been as low as in the 80 to 90 range. With the average Edgware property value hitting a record high, reaching almost £513,600 according to my research, this shortage of properties on the market over the last two years has contributed to this ‘fuller’ average property figure, but there is a glimmer of hope that the Edgware’s supply crisis may be starting to ease.

As I write this article, 2.24% of Edgware properties are up for sale. In terms of actual chimney pots, that equates to 406 properties on the market in Edgware (within 1 mile of the centre of Edgware) – which, when compared to only a year ago when that figure stood at 310, is a serious increase in the number of properties available to buy. Split down into the type of property; it makes even more fascinating reading…

  • Detached Properties in Edgware – 56 on the market a year ago compared to 64 on the market now – an increase of 14%
  • Semi Detached Properties in Edgware – 81 on the market a year ago compared to 112 on the market now – an increase of 38%
  • Terraced Properties in Edgware – 17 on the market a year ago compared to 40 on the market now – an increase of 135%
  • Flats / Apartments Properties in Edgware – 148 on the market a year ago compared to 181 on the market now – an increase of 22%

138-graph

This is evidence of strength in the Edgware housing market that many didn’t expect. Many believed that the Edgware property market wasn’t going to be strong enough post Brexit – as what was a sellers’ market before the Brexit vote and Buyers’ market in the early months after it, may now be somewhere in between and the market might just be coming back into balance.

However, all this will mean property values won’t continue to grow at the same extent they have been over the last 12 to 18 months, and in some months (especially on the run up to Christmas and early in the New Year), values might dip slightly. This won’t be down to Brexit but a re-balancing of the Edgware Property Market – which is good news for everyone.

If you are a landlord or thinking of becoming one for the first time, and you want to read more articles like this about the Edgware Property Market together with regular postings on what I consider the best buy to let deals in Edgware, out of the many of properties on the market, irrespective of which agent is selling it, then feel free to get in touch! email me on Steve@benjaminstevens.co.uk

If you are in the area feel free to pop into the office we are based at 194 Station Road Edgware Middlesex HA8 7AT– the kettle is always on.

Don’t forget to visit the links below to view back dated deals and Edgware Property News.

Blog – http://www.benjaminstevens.co.uk/edgware-property-blog

Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/BenjaminStevensEstateAgents

Twitter – https://twitter.com/BenjamStevensEA

Website – http://www.benjaminstevens.co.uk

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£9,500 boost to Edgware First time buyers

There’s a whole legion of wannabe Edgware first-time buyers keen to get on the property ladder and they now have a 3% price advantage over the previously quicker responding army of Edgware landlords with cash at the ready. Since the start of April, buy to let landlords have had to pay an additional 3% stamp duty so whilst demand from some Edgware buy to let landlords has dropped away, in the interim, it offers Edgware first time buyers (FTB’s) a chance to fill the vacuum with less competition from cash rich landlords (over two thirds of BTL properties were purchased without a mortgage in the last 7 years) who could bid more and complete quicker.

Looking at the average value of an apartment in Edgware currently standing at £318,300, that means if our Edgware FTB went up against a Edgware landlord, the landlord would have to pay an additional £9,549 in stamp duty. Early antidotal evidence from fellow property professionals in the suburb is suggesting landlords are reducing their offers slightly on Edgware properties to reflect the extra stamp duty.

Whilst on the face of it, it appears landlords are being punished by No.11 Downing Street, I actually believe this increase in stamp duty for landlords is a good thing for the Edgware property market as a whole.

Since 2011/12, the Edgware property market has performed very well indeed. Over the last 12 months, £303,179,434 has been spent buying 734 Edgware properties. Figures from the Land Registry have just been released and month on month in our council area, property values are 0.3% higher, yet 11.8% higher year on year. These figures are nowhere near the heady days of 2000 (May to be exact), when Edgware property prices rose by 26.8% in 12 months.

So as property values in Edgware (and the UK as whole) start to stablise and come back to some kind of balance, I am beginning to see savvy landlords view the Edgware property market in a different light. Even with the Spring rush, gone are the days where you could make limitless money on anything that had a door, a few windows and roof. This stamp duty change has made more and more landlords, after reading the Edgware Property Market Blog www.edgwarepropertyblog.com take advice on what or not to buy and what to pay, meaning Edgware landlords are being more calculated with their Edgware BTL purchases. I am also seeing a variance between relatively brisk current price momentum and softer expectations in terms of property value growth in Edgware, this in part reflects amplified uncertainty about the short term economic outlook (eg Brexit, Issues in the Far East etc).

Now I know a lot of Edgware landlords brought forward their BTL purchases to beat the stamp duty deadline. However, it is probable that hunger from Edgware investors will return for the right Edgware property later in the year, especially if it’s at the right price and offers a decent yield. However, in the meantime, Edgware FTB’s could and should, in the short term, make hay whilst the sun shines plug the gap and grab a bargain!

If you are a landlord or thinking of becoming one for the first time, and you want to read more articles like this about the Edgware Property Market together with regular postings on what I consider the best buy to let deals in Edgware, out of the many of properties on the market, irrespective of which agent is selling it, then feel free to get in touch! email me on Steve@benjaminstevens.co.uk

If you are in the area feel free to pop into the office we are based at 194 Station Road Edgware Middlesex HA8 7AT– the kettle is always on.

Don’t forget to visit the links below to view back dated deals and Edgware Property News.

Blog – http://www.benjaminstevens.co.uk/edgware-property-blog

Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/BenjaminStevensEstateAgents

Twitter – https://twitter.com/BenjamStevensEA

Website – http://www.benjaminstevens.co.uk

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Private Renting set to grow by 2,100 Edgware households by 2025

137I was having a most interesting chat the other day with an Edgware landlord when we were looking at a property. As I am sure you are aware, I am always happy to cast my eye over any potential buy to let purchase in Edgware, be that you emailing me a Rightmove link, a brochure in the post or even treading the carpet and seeing it together. I don’t charge for that, and you don’t even need to be a client of mine. We got talking about the Edgware Property Market and this landlord brought up the subject of a report he had read from the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) and PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) that stated almost 1.8m new rental homes are needed by 2025 to keep up with current demand from tenants. He wanted to know what this meant for Edgware.

Well my blog reading friends, some commentators said last Winter that buy to let was about to die, what with the new stamp duty changes and how mortgage tax relief will be calculated. Others even said 500,000 rental properties would flood the market nationally in the 12 months after the new Stamp Duty rules came into force on the 1st April 2016 as landlords left the rental market. Well, all I can say is, I wish all the landlords of those half a million properties would hurry up and put them on the market – because I have plenty of other potential landlords wanting to buy them!

Back to the matter in hand.. if the RICS and PwC are indeed correct, what does this mean for Edgware? The fact is, as a country, we are facing a precarious rental shortage and need to get Edgware building in a way that benefits a cross-section of Edgware society, not just the fortunate few. I call on the Prime Minister to drop the higher stamp duty tax on buy to let purchases to ease the pressure on the rental market.

Of the 22,900 households in Edgware, currently 16,100 tenants live in 4,900 private rented properties. If we apportion those 1.8m households equally around the Country, that means in nine years’ time, the number of rental properties in Edgware needs to rise by 2,100 (i.e. 42.8%) .. taking the total number of rented properties in the city to 7,000.

That means Edgware landlords need to buy around 200 properties a year between now and 2025 to meet that demand – because according to my calculations, an additional 6,900 people will want to live in all those ‘additional’ Edgware rental properties – so why is the government penalising landlords?

Thankfully the new housing minister Gavin Barwell detached Teresa May’s new administration from the Cameron/Osborne laser-like focus of just home ownership to solve our housing issues, saying “we need to build more homes for every single type of person needing a home and not focus on one single tenure”. The private rented sector became a stooge under David Cameron’s watch and still, with increasingly unaffordable Edgware house prices, the majority of new Edgware households will be relying on the rental sector in the future to house them. I can only say Westminster must put in place the measures that will allow the rental sector to flourish. Any restrictions on the supply of rental property will push up rents (bad news for tenants), thus side-lining those members of Edgware society who are already struggling. Let’s hope this new Government continues to see the contribution landlords give to the country as a whole.

If you are a landlord or thinking of becoming one for the first time, and you want to read more articles like this about the Edgware Property Market together with regular postings on what I consider the best buy to let deals in Edgware, out of the many of properties on the market, irrespective of which agent is selling it, then feel free to get in touch! email me on Steve@benjaminstevens.co.uk

If you are in the area feel free to pop into the office we are based at 194 Station Road Edgware Middlesex HA8 7AT– the kettle is always on.

Don’t forget to visit the links below to view back dated deals and Edgware Property News.

Blog – http://www.benjaminstevens.co.uk/edgware-property-blog

Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/BenjaminStevensEstateAgents

Twitter – https://twitter.com/BenjamStevensEA

Website – http://www.benjaminstevens.co.uk

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